A garden in the shape of dreams

Christopher is dressed in a white shirt and wears a crown made of grass. He is holding a botanical book with a picture of the plant known as Catharanthus Roseus that used to be his best friend as a child. A plant that heals the body and soul.
Christopher is dressed in a white shirt and wears a crown made of grass. He is holding a botanical book with a picture of the plant known as Catharanthus Roseus that used to be his best friend as a child. A plant that heals the body and soul.
Christopher's hands gesture over a Sukia figure, an indigenous 800-year-old shamanic sculpture made of volcanic rock. In the background a Catholic crucifix with a purple background. Pain and colonization inhabit the body.
Christopher’s hands gesture over a Sukia figure, an indigenous 800-year-old shamanic sculpture made of volcanic rock. In the background a Catholic crucifix with a purple background. Pain and colonization inhabit the body.
Christopher hugs a coat made of grass and conjures up the image of a raging mountain. His facial expression is intense and his forehead is sweating.
Christopher hugs a coat made of grass and conjures up the image of a raging mountain. His facial expression is intense and his forehead is sweating.
With the sky and the sea in his hands. Christopher holds up a blue cotton blanket and throws it hard back.
With the sky and the sea in his hands. Christopher holds up a blue cotton blanket and throws it hard back.

Social behaviour in a natural disaster. Intergenerational trauma as a result of Colonization. An imaginary plant kingdom: A Garden in the Shape of Dreams meditates on Paracosm, a persistent evocation of an imagined place, inhabited by imaginary people or beings. A complex response to times of hardship and trauma in childhood.

My ancestral memory takes me back 30 years ago, a time when a calamitous earthquake destroyed the beautiful Caribbean coast of Central America, where my best imaginary friend and I used to live.

A Garden in the Shape of Dreams is part of the series “Memories of a disabled child: the real, the imaginary and the misunderstood”.

Photo Credit by Kathryn Butler Photography for Performance Mix Festival

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